Molecular Pathology & Genomics

Telomere findings may offer insights

A new study shows that an enzyme called PARP1 is involved in repair of telomeres – the lengths of DNA that protect the tips of chromosomes – and that impairing this process can lead to telomere shortening and genomic instability that can cause cancer.

Beyond SARS-COV-2

Dr Jennifer Cane, a Postdoctoral Research Assistant, asks what sequencing respiratory viruses can tell us.

Microsatellite instability cancer tests

New US research compares the data of newly diagnosed cancer patients who received two different types of tests to determine their course of treatment.

Novel genetic variants associated with Alzheimer’s disease

New research has identified several genetic variants that may influence Alzheimer’s disease risk, putting researchers one step closer to uncovering biological pathways to target for future treatment and prevention.

Bat swarming and immunity

Bats carry some of the deadliest zoonotic diseases that can infect both humans and animals, such as Ebola and COVID-19.

Fibroblast cells and pancreatic cancer growth

Older people may be at greater risk of developing pancreatic cancer and have poorer prognoses because of age-related changes in cells in the pancreas called fibroblasts, it is claimed.

Pores for thought

A team from Nottingham looks at intraoperative molecular diagnosis of brain tumours using nanopore sequencing.

Specialist diploma in molecular pathology

On behalf of the members of the Molecular Pathology Advisory Panel, Chair Dr Andrew Blann introduces the new Specialist Diploma.

The role of organelle repair in fighting infection

Research has found that cellular structures act as “molecular plasters” that protect against infections, such as tuberculosis. We talk to study co-author Claudio Bussi.

Early-stage stem cell therapy trial

An international team has shown that the injection of a type of stem cell into the brains of patients living with progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) is safe, well tolerated and has a long-lasting effect that appears to protect the brain from further damage.

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